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Jordan
INTRODUCTION
1. Geography
2. Political situation
3. Economy
a. Figures
4. Health
5. Education
a. Universities
6. Demographics
7. Religions
a. Freedom
8. Peoples
9. Languages
10. Human rights
11. History
12. Cities and Towns



























Open the online Arabic language course






Index / Languages
Open map of JordanFlag of JordanJordan /
Languages



Languages
Figures in 1000.
Semitic 6,160 97.0%
Arabic
6,160 97.0%
South Levantine
4,350 69.0%
Levantine Bedouin
850 13.0%
Mesopotamian
640 10.0%
North Mesopotamian
245 4.0%
Najdi
65 1.0%
Egyptian
11 0.2%
Caucasian 123 1.9%
Circassian
117 1.8%
Adyghe
55 0.9%
Kabardian
62 1.0%
Chechen
6 0.1%
Indo-Aryan 28 0.4%
Domari
28 0.4%
Indo-European 16 0.3%
Armenian
16 0.3%
Turkic 6 0.1%
Azerbaijani
6 0.1%
Iranian 4 0.1%
Kurdish
4 0.1%
Northern
4 0.1%
Other 6 0.1%
Tagalog
6 0.1%

Although there are several languages spoken in Jordan, Arabic is both the official language and the only language of communication in everyday life. English is the main foreign language, especially in business and commerce and widely understood by the upper and middle classes. The ethnic groups that have upheld their native tongue use this between themselves, and are fluent in Arabic for communication with other groups.
Being very much as a junction between Arabia and the Middle East, many dialects of Arabic intersect in Jordan. The dialects that can be considered native to Jordan are Levantine, both the South and the Bedouin. South Levantine is largely spoken by Jordanian Arabs and Palestinians, Levantine Bedouin by Bedouins. In the north of Jordan, Mesopotamian dialects are strongly represented, and in the far east Najdi, one of the main dialects of Saudi Arabia. Egyptian Arabic is represented by foreign workers from Egypt.
Tagalog is spoken by Philippine foreign workers.




By Tore Kjeilen