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Kuwait
INTRODUCTION
1. Geography
2. Political situation
a. Rulers
3. Defense
4. Economy
a. Figures
5. Health
6. Education
a. Universities
7. Media
8. Demographics
9. Religions
a. Freedom
10. Peoples
11. Languages
12. Human rights
13. History
14. Cities and Towns



























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Index / Economy /
Open map of KuwaitFlag of KuwaitKuwait /
Economy



Kuwait 20 dinars
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Key figures
GDP per capita
US$57,500.
World average: +450%.
MENA rank: 2 of 23.
GDP
US$149.5 billion.
MENA rank: 8 of 23.
List of figuresAll other figures
Corruption
4.1 points of 10 max.
World rank: 66 of 180.
MENA rank: 10 of 21.
Investment friendly
World rank: 52 of 181.
MENA rank: 6 of 21.
Economic freedom
65.4 points of 100 max.
World rank: 50 of 179.
MENA rank: 5 of 19.
Value of Currency
Sep. 1997:
US$1=0.31 Dinars

Sep. 2008:
US$1=0.27 Dinars

Kuwait 10 dinars
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Kuwait 5 dinars
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Kuwait 1 dinar
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There are few other sources of income for Kuwait than petroleum production, and income from the country's investments abroad. The foreign investments come from a fund that is based upon 10% of oil revenues. The oil reserves of Kuwait is estimated to around 10% of the world total, and will at the present level of extraction last for 150 years more. Production level did quickly return to the level it had before the Iraqi occupation in 1990.
Industries of Kuwait are connected to petroleum, and Kuwait is refining its oil.
Agriculture and food production is limited, and make up less than 2% of GNP. Fishing is becoming more and more important, and is at the level of 9,000 tons annually.
The infrastructure in the eastern part of Kuwait is well developed, and comprise 4,700 km of roads, and an international airport near Kuwait City. There are 5 newspapers, 2 in English. Telephones, radios, TV-sets, and PCs are common among all citizens.




By Tore Kjeilen