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Tokat





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Tokat

Tokat, Turkey.
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Tokat, Turkey.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Tokat, Turkey. Photo: Turc Olive.

Tokat, Turkey.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Photo: Turc Olive.

Tokat, Turkey.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Photo: Turc Olive.

City in north central Turkey with 110,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate), lying along a tributary to the Yesil river, at 620 metres above sea level. It is the capital of Tokat province with 830,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate).
The region of Tokat has an agriculture specialized in fruit-growing. Other produce include tobacco, cereals and sugar beets. There is also extraction of minerals like lignite, antimony and marble. Tokat's industries include manufacture of copper utensils, tanning and calico printing.
Tokat is well-connected with other urban centres by road. Turhal is 45 km west, Amasya 115 km northwest, Zile 70 km west and Sivas 110 km southeast.
Among he landmarks of Tokat is the ruined citadel lying on a steep hills above the city, often identified as the fortress Dazimon. Most of the other historical buildings date back to the Seljuq period, like Gök Medrese from 1275 with its blue tiles. The Halef Gazi Tekkesi monastery dates back to late 13th century.
Tokat is famous for having been the place where Julius Caesar uttered the words "Veni, vidi, vici" (I came, I saw, I conquered) in 47 BCE, after having defeated and extinguished Pontus.

History
Tokat is the continuation of ancient Comana of Pontus, which was one of the most important cities of the Pontus district during the Roman period.
47 BCE: The Romans defeat and destroy Pontus at Zile, just outside Comana (Tokat).
1071 CE: Becomes part of a the Danismend Turkmen pricipality, and one of its most important cities. It profited from the trade between Anatolia and Persia
13the century: Comes under the Seljuqs.
1392: Incorporated into the Ottoman Empire by the request of the inhabitants, who suffered hard from repeated raids by the Mongols.
15th century: Under the Ottomans, Tokat could enjoy safety and economic growth. But the trade route to Persia would soon lose its importance, resulting in decline for Tokat.




By Tore Kjeilen